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Video Killed The Resume Star?

Shooting an online video used to be the exploit of Gen Y extroverts applying for Big Brother.  But fuelled by an ever-competitive labour market, some employers are now asking their candidates to compile their own YouTube videos as part of their application. Employment Office Managing Director Tudor Marsden-Huggins says an increasing number of organisations are [...]

Shooting an online video used to be the exploit of Gen Y extroverts applying for Big Brother.  But fuelled by an ever-competitive labour market, some employers are now asking their candidates to compile their own YouTube videos as part of their application.

Employment Office Managing Director Tudor Marsden-Huggins says an increasing number of organisations are using online videos as a legitimate recruitment tool.

“Businesses have been using social media videos to attract candidates to their company for years, but now we are seeing online videos for recruitment really gain momentum.  In the last year we’ve helped several of our clients expand their recruitment strategies to accept video applications shot by candidates on their laptop,” he says.

“In just a few moments a video can show an employer about a candidate’s presentation, communication style, creativity and potential cultural fit,” Marsden-Huggins says.

“It’s an approach that’s seeing a lot of take-up for frontline jobs in the more personality-based industries at the moment – hospitality, retail, marketing and customer service – but it’s got far more potential than that,”

While video recruitment may appear as a natural option for job seekers used to social networking, that doesn’t necessarily mean it’s a method only suited to Gen Y, as Tourism Queensland’s Best Job In The World video recruitment campaign showed in 2009.

That campaign had a lot of publicity money behind it, but worth noting is that online video applications came from a broad cross-section of people, and of all ages.

“This isn’t just a Gen Y thing. Anyone with a digital camera can film an application, and businesses don’t need anything more than the internet to view them,” Marsden-Huggins says.

In an another social networking inspired departure from traditional application methods, some jobseekers have taken to sending their ‘twesumes’, or Twitter resumes, to potential employers.

Confined to just 140 characters, candidates tweet a company outlining what job they’re interested in, a couple of key points about themselves, and a link to a more in-depth online profile.

Marsden-Huggins warns jobseekers not to throw out their CVs just yet, but says that things are definitely changing. “Using YouTube and Twitter for recruitment is still in its infancy, but it’s guaranteed to become more prominent as businesses learn to use social media more effectively,” he says.

“A written application will always serve a vital purpose, but social networking is going to play a larger part in recruitment in 2012.”