Read these Tips, then start contacting engravers and clearing the mantelpiece.

[Guide] Top 10 Tips: Writing a Job Ad #5 – #1

Yesterday we started a countdown of the Top 10 Tips to remember when you’re writing the copy for a job ad. Today we follow the traditional countdown format in bringing you the remainder of that list. So here follows the Top 5 ways to avoid the post-publishing regrets, and to get the best result for [...]

Yesterday we started a countdown of the Top 10 Tips to remember when you’re writing the copy for a job ad.

Today we follow the traditional countdown format in bringing you the remainder of that list. So here follows the Top 5 ways to avoid the post-publishing regrets, and to get the best result for the advertising dollars you’re shelling out:

 

5. Include the job location. Make it clear from the start of the ad where the person will be based. For potential applicants, this is one of the most important considerations of a new job. If there’s travel involved or it’s working from a number of sites, this is also vital.

4. Salary. The importance of including a salary cannot be overestimated. Just think – if you were looking for a new job, how much would the salary influence your decision? If it’s not possible to give a definitive number, include a salary range, an OTE figure, an Award or at least mention that the salary will be negotiable.

3. Make the job title simple and explanatory. This is the first thing that people see about any role, and it’s here that they decide whether to read further or not. Don’t leave it too vague – nobody who’s scrolling through hundreds of jobs is going to take the time to find out if they’re suited to a job called Manager, without knowing if it’s an office manager, a fast food manager, a construction manager or a golf course manager.

2. Use the name of your company. Candidates are much more likely to apply for a job if they know who they’re applying to, and can do some independent research online.

1. Proof read your ad. Get someone else to proof read your ad, for the lvoe of god (see what I did there?) It’s the most obvious thing in the world, but it’s surprising how often you’ll see a “Manger” advertised. Nothing tells applicants not to care about your business more than the impression that you don’t.

 

Now get recruiting.