I'll keep scanning, but there's no mention of the whereabouts of Curly's Gold so far...

Recruitment Marketing In History: 1974 – US Army & Marines

“Recruitment marketing” and “Recruitment advertising” are terms that we think about in a very post-social-media online-heavy context today. But the need for employers to advertise or market their jobs is far from a new phenomenon. To put our current approaches in perspective, today we’re starting a regular look back into Recruitment Marketing through history. Maybe [...]

“Recruitment marketing” and “Recruitment advertising” are terms that we think about in a very post-social-media online-heavy context today. But the need for employers to advertise or market their jobs is far from a new phenomenon.

To put our current approaches in perspective, today we’re starting a regular look back into Recruitment Marketing through history. Maybe you’ll find a long-forgotten idea that still translates to today’s audience. Or more likely, we can just all feel superior to how these poor saps used to do it.

 

To start things off, we found the term “recruitment advertising” used in a 1974 article in the well-known rag the Telegraph Herald from Dubuque, Iowa. The Herald reports that the US Army has “decided to reopen the bidding on its $40 million recruitment advertising contract”, following some annoying suspicions of official misconduct over its original contract. Luckily this was the last time a government department was suspected of awarding contracts with ulterior motives in mind, so we learned a lesson.

 

You can check out the original story at the Telegraph Herald here.

 

Or for something a bit more fun, check out the type of recruitment advertising the US armed forces were paying for at the time, with this Marines recruitment ad from the ’70s:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2isOLWnPk4o