Pinterest Recruitment

A guide to recruiting (and retaining!) Gen Y & Z

It’s the age of social media, and with employers everywhere jumping on the technology bandwagon it important to recognise who they’re actually targeting instead of just following the trends. More often than not, employers are trying to recruit fresh talent from the more tech-savvy Y & Z generations. And with Gen Z predicted to make [...]

It’s the age of social media, and with employers everywhere jumping on the technology bandwagon it important to recognise who they’re actually targeting instead of just following the trends. More often than not, employers are trying to recruit fresh talent from the more tech-savvy Y & Z generations. And with Gen Z predicted to make up 36% of the workforce by 2020 it’s no wonder employers are getting in earlier than ever.

To help you navigate this fast changing world of Twitter, Facebook, Linkedin, Youtube and even the latest craze of Pinterest, we’ve provided 6 social media steps to ensure you’re not only advertising your jobs in the right places, but also to the right people.

1. Build a credible brand

Developing a strong and credible brand is essential to recruiting these generations. As as soon as they commit to working with you, your brand becomes their own. It can increase or decrease their social status as it appears across their many online profiles and essentially adds to their image. A poor or ill-defined brand can also run the risk of attracting negative feedback online. As social media is all about creating a conversation with prospective candidates, employers need to do everything possible to keep their interactions not only relatable, but also adhere to the image of the brand they want to present to applicants. It’s a fine line for employers to walk and for this reason formal guidelines for interacting with candidates online is always recommended.

2. Keep it Real

Arguably one of the most important aspects of recruiting Gen Y and Z candidates with social media is keeping all contact and advertising as authentic as possible. With Gen Y growing up immersed in marketing and Gen Z displaying traits of being genuinely distrustful of traditional advertising methods, making sure your recruitment strategy ‘keeps it real’ is essential. These generations realise that no company is perfect and will be open with criticising brands that position themselves as such. This open and blunt communication is also recommended for workplace interactions – Gen Y’s and Z’s like to know when they’re doing things right (and wrong), and ‘secretive’ or closed door management styles don’t sit well.

3. Change = Stability

These generations have grown up in front of a laptop, with the TV on in the background, a phone in their hand and an iPod in their ear. They are the ultimate multi-taskers. This needs to be taken into consideration in the workplace. Putting them in a cubicle with a blocked internet and no mobile policy just won’t wash. Gen Y’s and Z’s are highly transient and variable and the only way to really keep them engaged in a career with your organisation is to provide them with challenging tasks and varied work days. Gen Z’s are predicted to be the most qualified of generations, as they graduate with a mix of degrees, certificates, diplomas and more. Keeping them engaged in your workplace is essential from the start as they have little interest in working their way up.

4. Reward & Recognition

Gen Y & Z have grown up taking tests, exams, submitting assessments and producing reports for the majority of the lives, and so the concept of feedback and reward is not only desired, but expected from them. It would be out of the norm for these generations to turn up day-in and day-out without any form of appraisal and recognition for their hard work. Baby boomers in particular will have to adjust their attitude for these generations as the attitude of working hard and getting paid is foreign to these candidates. They want to be told constantly how they are doing in their jobs, why they are doing them well, and what they will get for this. While also being the most indebted generations in history with a multitude of student loans, car loans and credit card debt, they expect to not only receive a competitive salary, but also be recognized for their contributions.

5. Create a community

Social media is essentially an instantaneous ‘word of mouth’ machine, and for this reason it is important employers are creating the best impression they can. Often the most effective way of doing this is to create a community of loyal followers, be it on Facebook or Twitter, that can help to support your ideals through constant, open and personable communication with prospective employees. It’s essential to ‘humanise’ your profiles so candidates know they are talking to a person instead of a faceless organisation. This is particularly important with Gen Z’s who rely more than ever on the opinions and recommendations of their friends and extended network over advertising and marketing.  A shared post on their Facebook of your job from one of their 500 friends is much more likely to get a click through, no matter how many times they may have seen your advertisement in the paper, in their emails or even in an advertisement online.

6. Keep up with the times

As these generations are all so technology savvy, they expect potential employers to be as tapped into the upcoming social media trends as they are. The newest social media craze of Pinterest is making great strides in providing credible avenues for employers to undertake all of the above tips in their recruitment marketing strategy. Currently sitting as the third most popular social network, Pinterest allows for employers to share images, similar to the style of a magazine or collage, with a community of ‘followers’.  Pinterest allows employers to build a credible brand by filling out a complete profile (make sure to include contact details!) as well as being able to post real pictures of their office, social events and gatherings. If a picture is worth a thousand words – Pinterest is by far the most realistic and informative way of telling candidates about your company. It will also allow you to tap into a growing community through targeted images, key words, job descriptions and hash tags. Pinterest is all about building a community and a ‘buzz’ around your organisation that can then be fed out into other avenues like Facebook or LinkedIn, where you can directly contact prospective employees.