HR

Crowdsourcing for Recruiting

Ah, crowdsourcing. What exactly is it? A nice simple description is this one: a company posts a problem online (looking for candidate who possesses X skills), a vast number of individuals offer their opinions and ideas as to how to solve it (I know someone who fits the bill!), the winning idea is rewarded in [...]

Ah, crowdsourcing. What exactly is it? A nice simple description is this one: a company posts a problem online (looking for candidate who possesses X skills), a vast number of individuals offer their opinions and ideas as to how to solve it (I know someone who fits the bill!), the winning idea is rewarded in some form (money, bonus, product?), the end result is the company adopting the idea for its own benefit (you’re hired!).  So who is using it for recruiting? Companies like Accenture, Burger King, Hershey, Intel, Mattel, Microsoft, UPS, and even the US Department of State.

A great buzz generator and brand opportunity, crowdsourcing is the “it” way to recruit. However, like social media, organizations need to have a strategy in place before jumping in.  Especially since these two are often linked to each other.  Did you see the Doritos “Crash the Super Bowl” campaign? A successful endeavor! Doritos fans created their own advertisements for the chance to win a trip to the game, $25,000 cash, and the fame of creating a Super Bowl advertisement. In 2011, four consumer-created ads for Doritos and Pepsi Max ranked among the top ten in the USA TODAY Ad Meter.

Since there isn’t a “one-size fits all” solution to recruiting the right people (wouldn’t it be nice if there was) make sure your organization follows these simple rules before attempting to crowdsource:

  • Make sure you have a crowd.
    Crowdsourcing can absolutely grow your brand but it won’t create one for you. You must already have a well known brand and presence where you decide to launch CS.
  • Make the “prize” compelling.
    If you’re asking others to source for you – what are you going to give them? Someone will get a job… The person who found them for you will get….What? A year’s subscription to magazine X won’t cut it. Money talks… How much can you spend while still counting this solution as a win against cost?
  • Make it simple.
    A “go ahead” after an online assessment – maybe? What is the criteria that folks need to meet to “win”? The point is to lessen the work for you, yes, but the idea isn’t to create a lot of work for someone else. Make it as easy as possible for the candidate and person who referred them (if any) to reach you and be considered.

I’d love to hear your crowdsourcing tales. What worked, what didn’t, what have you tried? Please drop me a line and let me know your story!

Source: http://www.hci.org Article: Crowdsourcing for Recruiting