3.are_there_any_reasons_to_ask_the_easy_questions

Are There Any Reasons to Ask the Easy Questions?

Interviews shouldn’t be easy for the applicant. They should be nice and cordial (you’re trying to make sure that the individual wants to work for your company by the end of the interview as well), and they should treat the applicant with respect, but they shouldn’t be easy. You want to make sure you have [...]

Interviews shouldn’t be easy for the applicant. They should be nice and cordial (you’re trying to make sure that the individual wants to work for your company by the end of the interview as well), and they should treat the applicant with respect, but they shouldn’t be easy. You want to make sure you have the right applicant. If you only ask simple questions, you have no way of knowing that the applicant has the intelligence and skill necessary to make a great new hire.

But that doesn’t mean that every question should be difficult. Questions like “what are your greatest strengths” are simple questions – questions that the applicant can easily prepare for – but they still need to be asked at the interview. There are several reasons that you want to ask softball questions throughout the interview process. These include:

  • Building Rapport – You can’t go into an interview asking only the hardest questions. You need to generate some rapport with the applicant, and you can only do that if you make them feel confident around you. Indeed, easy questions are also a confidence builder – getting the applicant into a groove where their nervousness melts away and they feel like they can talk to you. Easy questions, especially at the beginning of the interview, are still important.
  • Gauging Personality – Easy questions may be easy, but the candidate’s ability to answer them is still important. Perhaps the candidate came woefully unprepared to the interview. You want to know whether or not they’re flustered by easy questions, because this tells you something about them as a person.
  • Still Informative – Finally, the reality is that you can still learn a lot from even the easiest questions. They give you an opportunity to learn a great deal about the candidate. Something like “what are your greatest strengths” is still a question where the candidate can choose between a cliché answer and a meaningful answer. If they choose a meaningful answer, then you learn a lot about them,

Harder questions often give you more insight than the easier questions do. When a question is difficult to answer, the words that come out of their mouth are nearly guaranteed to be unrehearsed, and so you see both how they think on the spot and what types of answers come into their head. It’s a great learning experience and a great recruitment tool.

But easy questions are not without their value, and in many cases they can be as valuable or more valuable than the harder questions. You should never have an entire interview filled with just easy questions, but you should also never have an entire interview with only hard questions. It needs to be the right balance to really find the best candidate.

At Recruit Shop, we’ve been developing our recruitment strategies for years, and are proud to offer a low cost and guaranteed recruitment service. Contact us today to find out more.