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How to Use Internet Tools to Spot Fake Resumes

The Internet is a great resource. It’s one of the main ways that your company markets itself to applicants, and one of the reasons that you’re able to broaden your search to find potential new hires from not only Australia, but all over the world. Yet this same resource can cause these same employers headaches. [...]

The Internet is a great resource. It’s one of the main ways that your company markets itself to applicants, and one of the reasons that you’re able to broaden your search to find potential new hires from not only Australia, but all over the world.

Yet this same resource can cause these same employers headaches. That is because your applicants can use the internet to cheat or shortcut their way towards landing the job.

Examples of Recruitment Shortcuts
There are hundreds of websites currently dedicated to providing interview and CV tips for job applicants. There’s nothing inherently wrong with using these websites. After all, preparation is often the sign of a good future employee.

But in some cases the applicant can take that information too far – essentially stealing their cover letter, CV, or interview answers in order to land the position. Many cut and paste from resume and CV websites, lifting what they need to sound intelligent and using false information to land the job.

Your goal is not to find the applicant that steals best. Your goal is to find an applicant that will thrive in your company. When in doubt, consider the following strategies to spot those that are not being honest throughout the recruitment process.

Tip 1: Copyscape.com
Copyscape is used by those that write and pay for content to ensure that the content itself has been uniquely written for their websites. The website is used to spot online plagiarism – a major problem in today’s Internet world. For only about 5 cents, you can run a person’s entire application through Copyscape and find out if any sentences were taken from online CV resources.

Tip 2: Familiarize Yourself With Interview Tip Websites
You should also get to know these interview tip websites and see what they’re saying. It’s not a bad idea to search for questions you’re going to ask in Google and find out what answers these websites say the applicant should provide. If you then hear someone provide that answer, you know there is a pretty good chance it was lifted from these informative sites.

Tip 3: Search for Answer Information
Most people are already familiar with the idea of Googling a candidate to find out what shows up. But not many people use search engines to verify facts. Often in a person’s answer they will make a claim that, if untrue, can be disproven simply by searching for either their answer or the facts within that claim. For example, if the person claims they worked for a research paper, you can go to Google Scholar and see if any research papers have their name, thus ensuring that they’re not making it up.

The Internet and Recruitment
There is considerable value in taking advantage of these Internet tools. You don’t want to fall for someone’s dishonesty. You want to be able to catch them in the act and move on to better candidates. Whether it’s verifying they wrote from scratch the entirety of their CV and cover letter or fact checking them and their answers, the Internet has a variety of ways to spot anyone that tries to game the system long before they’ve been hired.

This is a guest article by Micah Abraham of Great Leap Studios, a content marketing company.